Cap for Canadian Permanent Residence category for Professional Occupations in Business Services to Management has been reached

Posted by Veronica Zanfir|Global Immigration
Aug 11
31


 

The immigration cap for Professional Occupations in Business Services to Management has been filled.  As of August 29, all 500 posts available under this category were filled. In June of 2012, the category will be reviewed, and if retained on the list of priority occupations for Canadian immigration, another set of 500 posts will open. It is a near certainty that, at that time, a surplus of applicants will have had their applications ready for submission for some time, awaiting the re-opening of the cap, and therefore all 500 posts are anticipated to be filled within a very short period of time. It is therefore imperative that any applicants qualifying under this category begin the process of collecting their documents and perfecting their application as early as possible.

Currently, there are 29 professions that are eligible for admission to Canada under the Federal Skilled Worker Program. Each of the 29 categories holds 500 spots, with the  Professional Occupations in Business Services to Management  being the first category to close its cap at this time.

For further information regarding permanent immigration to Canada contact PricewaterhouseCoopers Immigration Law LLP at sarah.adler@ca.pwc.com or 1-416-598-8849 or 1-800-993-9971.


Posted by Veronica Zanfir » No Comments »

Canadian Immigration Integration Program Improves Employment for Newcomers

Posted by Donna Habsha|Canada Immigration
Aug 11
22


In response to tales of immigrant surgeons driving taxi cabs, Ottawa launched the Canadian Immigration Integration Program (CIIP). The objective of the CIIP is to effectively prepare immigrants for successful integration while they are still in their country of origin. The two day program is currently available in the Philippines, China and India.

In 2010 foreign skilled workers in eight targeted occupations knew within a year of applying for a credential assessment whether their credentials are recognized or what additional courses they would need to take to have their credentials recognized. The Foreign Credentials Referral Office’s (FCRO) annual report released August 18th states 13,000 skilled immigrants had registered by September 2010 for pre-arrival orientation and credential assessment and 62% of participants found employment within 6-months of arrival, up from 44%.

In 2010 the foreign credentials office imposed a 12-month limit on assessment of international credentials for eight professions: architects, engineers, medical laboratory technologists, occupational therapists, pharmacists, physiotherapists, registered nurses and financial auditors/accountants. The one year time frame is to be expanded to include: dentists, engineering technicians, licensed practical nurses, medical radiation technologists, physicians and teachers. Given the reported numbers and resulting economic improvement for newcomers and for Canada, hopefully we will see the program expanded to other countries throughout the world.


Posted by Donna Habsha » No Comments »

Pilot project to attract more working families to British Columbia

Posted by Veronica Zanfir|Canada Immigration
Aug 11
15


On, August 15, 2011, a new pilot project will commence in B.C. to permit the family members of most temporary foreign workers (including many low-skilled foreign workers) to work while they are in Canada in the company of the principal applicant who was hired because of his or her skills.

Temporary foreign workers generally enter Canada holding a work permit that meets the need of a specific employer who has been unable to locate Canadians to fit an employment need. In the past, only spouses and common-law partners of temporary foreign workers working in a managerial, professional or skilled trades post of employment had access to open work permits (spousal work permits) that permitted them to work anywhere in British Columbia. As of August 15, spouses, common-law partners and working-age dependents of most temporary foreign workers will be able to secure open work permits. This includes the family members of workers in low-skilled occupations. A maximum of 1,800 open work permits will be offered under the pilot project.


Posted by Veronica Zanfir » No Comments »

Cap Limit of 500 to be reached shortly for Professional Occupations in Business Services to Management

Posted by Veronica Zanfir|Global Immigration
Aug 11
15


 

Citizenship and Immigration Canada’s immigration cap under the category of Professional Occupations in Business Services to Management is nearly filled. Currently, there are 29 professions that are eligible for admission to Canada under the Federal Skilled Worker Program. Each of the 29 categories holds 500 spots. As of August 10, 2011, 419 application had been received for processing under the category of Professional Occupations in Business Services to Management. With only 81 spots remaining, it is anticipated that Professional Occupations in Business Services to Management will be the first occupation to be filled well ahead of June 27, 2012 – when the list of professions will be revisited and the cap will re-open. Registered Nurses come in a distant second with only 148 applications received to date while Restaurant and Food Service Managers come in third with 34 applications received so far. Plumbers, Welders and Drillers have the least competition, with only one application submitted to date in each category.

For further information regarding permanent immigration to Canada contact PricewaterhouseCoopers Immigration Law LLP at sarah.adler@ca.pwc.com or 1-416-598-8849 or 1-800-993-9971.


Posted by Veronica Zanfir » No Comments »

Requesting Police Clearance Certificates from Singapore

Posted by Melodie Hughes|Canada Immigration
Aug 11
12


For all applications for permanent residence to Canada, Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) requires an original police clearance certificate from every country where the applicant has lived for at least six consecutive months since reaching the age of 18. In most cases, this certificate must be obtained prior to the filing of the permanent residence application.

For individuals who have resided in Singapore and are not citizens of the country, however, the process for obtaining this police clearance certificate from the Singapore Police Force has recently changed.

On October 18, 2010, the Singapore Police Force stopped issuing original police clearance certificates to non-Singapore citizens unless the application for one was accompanied by a letter from an immigration office showing the file number and name of the person who requires the certificate.

In recognizing this change in process, CIC issued a formal announcement this week that, effective immediately, all inland and visa offices requesting a Singapore police certificate from a non-Singapore citizen should send a sample letter to each applicant that they may submit to the Singapore Police Force, along with a copy of the letter issued by CIC. The Singapore Police Force will then send the police certificate(s) directly to the inland or visa office, and not to the applicant.

The procedures for obtaining a COC for Singapore citizens remain unchanged. For further information on obtaining police clearance certificates in support of your permanent residence application, please contact PricewaterhouseCoopers Immigration Law LLP at pwcimmigrationlaw-info@ca.pwc.com. Additional information and instructions can also be found on CIC’s website.


Posted by Melodie Hughes » No Comments »

Approval of Inadmissible Family Member – s.117(9)(g) Family Class Sponsorship

Posted by Veronica Zanfir|Canada Immigration
Aug 11
10


We were recently successful in securing a Permanent Residence visa for a dependent child who was not originally declared on her father’s initial Permanent Residence application and had not been medically examined. The Principal Applicant father had applied for Canadian Permanent Residence pursuant to the Federal Skilled Worker class some years ago and followed the bad advice of an immigration consultant, who had instructed him to exclude his daughter from the application. Several years after arriving in Canada, he attempted to sponsor his daughter, only to have his Family Sponsorship refused on the basis of s.117(9)(g) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act – for failure to declare his daughter in his original application. He then approached our law firm and, following our submissions and further liaising on our behalf with Citizenship and Immigration Canada at the visa post, the daughter received her Permanent Residence visa and the two were reunited in Canada earlier this year.

For assistance or representation with respect to Family Class Sponsorships please contact PricewaterhouseCoopers Immigration Law LLP at pwcimmigrationlaw-info@ca.pwc.com or 1-800-993-9971.


Posted by Veronica Zanfir » No Comments »